The Crows

April 6, 2019

The woman who has grown old
And knows desire must die,
Yet turns to love again,
Hears the crows’ cry.

She is a stem long hardened,
A weed that no scythe mows.
The heart’s laughter will be to her
The crying of the crows,

Who slide in the air with the same voice
Over what yields not, and what yields,
Alike in spring, and when there is only bitter
Winter-burning in the fields.

Louise Bogan 

a glimpse

April 6, 2019

A photograph is a fragment – a glimpse. We accumulate glimpses, fragments. All of us mentally stock hundreds of photographic images, subject to instant recall. All photographs aspire to the condition of being memorable – that is, unforgettable.

Susan Sontag

Photography: A Little Summa

A really useful Book

April 6, 2019

sweetness of her body

April 6, 2019

… I held her, tasting the warmth and sweetness of her body, salt from the sea – her earlobes tasted of salt…

 Lawrence Durrell

Justine 

Yet another Mind enriching post from:

Peedeel’s Blog

of

smut, literature,

voodoo, hoodoo &

so much more!

Peedeel’s Blog does not discriminate on the grounds of race, colour, religion, sex, sexual orientation, including transgender status and gender expression, national origin, citizenship status, age, disability, genetic information or status in employment, education, or whether you own a gerbil or not. Peedeel’s Blog aims to shock all, without bias, equally.  

an intimacy going

April 6, 2019

Every work has a shape. I work in a lot of different kinds of forms and a lot of the poems are long. I’m aware of using musical forms. I’m quite influenced by the symphonic form, for example, the sonata form. But I feel it’s really necessary to make as much of the formal construction of it as I can obvious and at the same time there’s an intimacy going on that has to do with the use of the human voice and the fact that one is talking to others and there’s the possibility of having some sort of enormous performance thing happen, as if performing a play.

Alice Notley

Seeing the future: a conversation with Alice Notley

voting for the right

April 6, 2019

All voting is a sort of gaming, like checkers or back gammon, with a slight moral tinge to it, a playing with right and wrong, with moral questions; and betting naturally accompanies it. The character of the voters is not staked. I cast my vote, perchance, as I think right; but I am not vitally concerned that that right should prevail. I am willing to leave it to the majority. Its obli­gation, therefore, never exceeds that of expediency. Even voting for the right is doing nothing for it. It is only expressing to men feebly your desire that it should prevail. A wise man will not leave the right to the mercy of chance, nor wish it to prevail through the power of the majority. 

Henry David Thoreau

Civil Disobedience, or Resistance to Civil Government