Lullaby

December 10, 2019

an ancient power captured

December 3, 2019

After all, I’m the horror writer; it’s why the editors of this publication have asked me to conduct this interview. I’m supposed to judge the veracity of Sarah’s footage and, assuming I accept it as true, trace its connections to Lost in the Dark, explain the ways in which the fiction refracts the facts. It’s a favourite critical activity, isn’t it? Especially when it comes to the fantastic, demonstrating how it’s only the stuff of daily life, after all. The vampire is our repressed eroticism, the werewolf our unreasoning rage. The film Sarah has shown me, though, isn’t the material of daily life. I don’t know what it is, because to tell you the truth, I’m more of a sceptic than a believer these days. Strange as it sounds, it’s one of the reasons I love to write about the supernatural. The stories I tell offer me the opportunity to indulge a sense of the numinous I find all too lacking in the world around me. But this movie…I can’t help inventing a story to explain it, something to do with an ancient power captured, brought to a remote location, and imprisoned there. Those dead men at the entrance, maybe they were there as a sacrifice, a way to bind whatever was in that nameless woman to the mine. The stuff inside the tunnels, the caves beyond, was that evidence of someone or someone’s tending to the woman, worshipping her? And Isabelle Router, her experience underground — was the movie she cowrote an act of devotion to something that found her in the dark? I half remember the line from Yeats about entertaining a drowsy emperor.

None of it makes any sense; it’s all constructed with playing cards, waiting for a sneeze to collapse it.

John Langan
Lost in the Dark

Last night’s film

December 1, 2019

Possession – Directed by Andrzej Żuławski

A spiral staircase movie, a never-ending metaphysical game of cat-and-mouse, a moral aspiration to the Heavens, a “spotlight” on God, a scornful detective movie, a horror movie and frightful, high-octane baroque work — Possession is all of that at once.

The Power of the Witch

November 10, 2019

No more Public Schools

October 9, 2019

So the Labour Party wish to abolish public schools like Eton, Harrow and Rugby. My God! What will become of those like Reginald Baliol Brett, 2nd Viscount Esher, who had a (not so) secret obsession for Eton boys? Those ‘golden laddies’ provided the inspiration for Brett’s small book of verse, Foam.

With a single stroke of Comrade Corbyn’s legislative wand, these inspiring young men will be no more! Can such a move be anything other than catastrophic? Like the closure of Punch, that once famous but now defunct weekly periodical, these things are symbolical of what makes Britain Great. That and the much-demonized Trident nuclear deterrent…

women in porn

September 14, 2019

In film theory everything has meaning. Everything is symbolic. Similarly, in pornography, as Dworkin points out “everything means something.” Gender means something, bodies mean something, body parts mean something, the acts done to women mean something. Getting a facial in your bedroom doesn’t necessarily have the same meaning as a woman getting a facial in a porn movie does and, in fact, the relevance of whether or not the individual actress in the porn appears to be ‘enjoying’ the cum shot to her face is less important than the larger meaning of the image on screen. I am not at all surprised that “the majority of porn shows women basking in and positively loving receiving a facial” or that “a lot more straight porn features women happily accepting facials than reacting with disgust and evident humiliation” because women in porn are presenting a fantasy and that fantasy is that women enjoy being objectified, cum on, gang-raped, called whores and bitches, whatever. Porn is about male fantasy. The fantasy is that women like everything you do to them, as man.

Megan Murphy
Facials, feminism, and performance: On f**king men in a patriarchy

So many thieves

September 13, 2019

Conrad Veidt & Sabu – My Favorite Version.

 

Slave for love

September 1, 2019

The first Doctor (William Hartnell): If you could touch the alien sand and hear the cries of strange birds, and watch them wheel in another sky, would that satisfy you

The second Doctor (Patrick Troughton): The fools. The stupid fools!

The third Doctor (Jon Pertwee) : A straight line may be the shortest distance between two points, but it is by no means the most interesting.

The fourth Doctor (Tom Baker) : Never be certain of anything. It’s a sign of weakness.

The fifth Doctor (Peter Davison) : There’s always something to look at if you open your eyes!

The sixth Doctor (Colin Baker) : Rest is for the weary, sleep is for the dead.

The seventh Doctor (Sylvester McCoy): Think about me when you’re living your life one day after another, all in a neat pattern. Think about the homeless traveller and his old police box, with his days like crazy paving.

The eighth Doctor (Paul McGann): Gallifrey! Yes! This must be where I live. Now, where is that?

The war Doctor (John Hurt): No. Great men are forged in fire. It is the privilege of lesser men to light the flame. Whatever the cost.

The ninth Doctor (Christopher Eccleston): You think it’ll last forever: people and cars and concrete. But it won’t. One day it’s all gone. Even the sky. My planet’s gone. It’s dead. It burned, like the Earth. It’s just rocks and dust. Before its time.

The tenth Doctor (David Tennant): And, I’ll tell you something else: We just met Queen Victoria!

The eleventh Doctor (Matt Smith): Are the peoples of this world guilty of any crimes punishable by the laws of the Atraxi?

The twelfth Doctor (Peter Capaldi): I’m the Doctor. I’ve lived for over two thousand years, and not all of them were good. I’ve made many mistakes, and it’s about time I did something about that…

The thirteenth Doctor (Jodie Whittaker): Don’t worry, I’ve got a plan.

I don’t have to tell you things are bad. Everybody knows things are bad. It’s a depression. Everybody’s out of work or scared of losing their job. The dollar buys a nickel’s worth. Banks are going bust. Shopkeepers keep a gun under the counter. Punks are running wild in the street and there’s nobody anywhere who seems to know what to do, and there’s no end to it. We know the air is unfit to breathe and our food is unfit to eat, and we sit watching our TVs while some local newscaster tells us that today we had fifteen homicides and sixty-three violent crimes, as if that’s the way it’s supposed to be. We know things are bad – worse than bad. They’re crazy.

Network (1976)
written by Paddy Chayefsky and directed by Sidney Lumet