Can this be true? Or is it more of that ‘Fake News’ we keep hearing about? Why hasn’t The Donald mention this? Why hasn’t he told the world?

Come on, Gay Aliens found in the wreck of a UFO! This story is a biggy, people. Why hasn’t The Donald tweeted about it, his silence is baffling?

 

You may have encountered this quote before on the internet, boys & girls:

“The planet does not need more successful people. The planet desperately needs more peacemakers, healers, restorers, storytellers and lovers of all kind.”

Credited to the Dalai Lama, no less – which is a load of old horse manure! He never said it; probably never would!

In fact the quote (a misquote to be accurate) is from David Orr’s book: ECOLOGICAL LITERACY: EDUCATING OUR CHILDREN FOR A SUSTAINABLE WORLD. Needless to say David Orr is an environmental scientist with an international reputation; he is NOT a Buddhist priest; nor is he Im Ho Tep. The actual quote from his book is:

“The plain fact is that the planet does not need more successful people. But it does desperately need more peacemakers, healers, restorers, storytellers, and lovers of every kind. It needs people who live well in their places. It needs people of moral courage willing to join the fight to make the world habitable and humane. And these qualities have little to do with success as we have defined it.”

So now you know.

the most poetic thing

March 25, 2018

a supernova remnant

Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded. And the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics.

You are all stardust.

You couldn’t be here if stars hadn’t exploded. Because the elements, the carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, iron, all the things that matter for evolution weren’t created at the beginning of time. They were created in the nuclear furnaces of stars. And the only way they could get into your body is if the stars were kind enough to explode.
So forget Jesus. The stars died so you could be here today.

Lawrence M Krauss
A Universe from Nothing

ability to believe

March 1, 2018

Believing in magic should not negate your ability to believe in science, practice critical thinking, or reserve belief in a thing until presented with proof.

Bree NicGarran
Breeland Walker

understand the Universe…

February 15, 2018

We are just an advanced breed of monkeys on a minor planet of a very average star. But we can understand the Universe. That makes us something very special.

Stephen Hawking
Questioning the Universe
(Steven Hawking’s TED talk)

In the last fifty years, computers and the internet have made such dramatic changes to the way we live that it’s impossible for many of us to do without them; they’re the nexus of business communications, a global marketplace, a one-click intelligence agency, a social forum. Basically, we live our lives on the internet.

And a few hundred years from now, your kids might be taking that literally.

With startling advances in robotics demonstrated every year, artificial intelligence is developing as fast as component technology becomes available. And as soon as neuroscience catches up, and human memories and brain chemistry can be replicated in fiberoptics, there will be no stopping kids of the future from transferring their consciousnesses into bitchin’ celebrity lookalikes with hydraulic balance and a two-hundred-year warranty.

However, no matter what they do, robotics will hit a wall when we realize no one will ever be able to replicate Rutger Hauer’s winsome, chilling stare. At that point, someone — probably your kid (your kid seems pretty clever) — will point out that humanity is essentially a single social network. After that, as fast as the server farms are ready, the upload frenzy will begin.

Now, while it’s true that our future progeny run the risk of becoming accidentally erased or deemed a bug in beta, the upside of a permanent, online world consciousness is that your descendants can look forward to relative immortality in a world with a scope as big as their collective imaginations. It also offers us a unique opportunity to look beyond physical borders…

Genevieve Valentine
Five Freaky Futures Your Kids Might Face

imagine the future…?

December 5, 2017

Reading New Scientist, I am acutely aware of how fast science and technology are changing — and in so many areas. Cybernetics, biotechnology, nanotechnology are all evolving quickly. Theoretical physics and cosmology are very much in flux, with facts that don’t fit into current theory, such as dark matter and dark energy, and hypotheses which can’t be tested, such as superstring theory. So how does a writer imagine the future, with so much changing rapidly and so much uncertain?

Eleanor Arnason
Me and Science Fiction: Dystopia, Dark Urban fantasy, Zombies and Monsters from the deep.

Robots to staff Brothels

December 1, 2017

Spanish scientist Sergi Santos designed silicone sex dolls with wigs and artificial brains that will not only earn him money but may also be used to staff brothels and help combat sex trafficking.

But the arrival of sex robots has divided opinion – this film by the Thomson Reuters Foundation explores the complex issues that have been raised by the increasingly life-like robots.

maninspace

Today, for the mass of humanity, science and technology embody ‘miracle, mystery, and authority’. Science promises that the most ancient human fantasies will at last be realized. Sickness and ageing will be abolished; scarcity and poverty will be no more; the species will become immortal. Like Christianity in the past, the modern cult of science lives on the hope of miracles. But to think that science can transform the human lot is to believe in magic. Time retorts to the illusions of humanism with the reality: frail, deranged, undelivered humanity. Even as it enables poverty to be diminished and sickness to be alleviated, science will be used to refine tyranny and perfect the art of war.

John N. Gray
Straw Dogs: Thoughts on Humans and Other Animals