magic

October 18, 2018

witch at seaside

Yet magic is no more than the art of employing consciously invisible means to produce visible effects. Will, love, and imagination are magic powers that everyone possesses; and whoever knows how to develop them to their fullest extent is a magician. Magic has but one dogma, namely, that the seen is the measure of the unseen.

W. Somerset Maugham
The Magician

Witch

September 25, 2018

We’re all born a Witch. We’re all born into magic. It’s taken from us as we grow up.

Madeleine L’Engle
The Crosswicks Journal

Witchcraft1

You need:
• An onion
• 12 Needles
• Black and Red Thread
• Chilli Peppers
• Spit

Select a large onion and slice it down the middle. Pull out a good amount of the center, and fill it with chilli peppers.

Close the onion and wrap a good amount of black thread right around the middle until its sturdy and closed.

Stab the needles in the onion in a circle diagonally around the entire onion.

Repeat crossing the circles, they should look like a giant “X” that circles around the onion. (6 for one circle and 6 the other).

Thread one of the circles with black thread, and the other with red.

One thread should go through each needle. When you’ve finish tie it off with a simple knot.

Place it in a bag (plastic trash bag is fine) or a box (cardboard is fine).

Visualise your enemy. Concentrate on them and speak the following verses:

“You crossed a line (name of your enemy), that much is true,
So now I’ll send my spite to you.
A wicked core will burn and ache
You crossed a line, your own mistake.

Needles sharp and eyes of thread
Sleep now as you’ve made this bed
Many layers deep it will delve
A year of bitterness, these months of twelve.”

Before you seal off the container (bag or box) spit into it if you want them to know somehow all these bad things are your handiwork.

Seal the container and dispose of the onion.

Enjoy your enemy’s discomfort.

shrink unfaithful lovers

June 12, 2018

witch - digital painting by webneel_com (6)

We chant around the grill in our backyard every Friday the 13th to scare the neighbours who told the Homeowners’ Association our violet paint job was garish. We powder newt tongue and kitten whiskers into hangover smoothies. We concoct lipstick out of rose petals and rattlesnake blood. We whisper made-up spells when telemarketers call until they, unnerved, hang up. We zap our router in frustration when the Wi-Fi goes out until it collapses into ash. We zip catcallers’ lips shut. We push fraternity brothers off bus seats with our minds til they sprawl in the aisle. We steal male colleagues’ best ideas from their stress-dreams. We send packages to the news station with dirty lingerie and sex tapes featuring town councilmen who say thirteen women living in a house together must be operating a brothel. We shrink unfaithful lovers’ penises. We stick needles into poppets dressed with our mothers’ grayest hairs to silence their daily nagging calls. We steal our high school rivals’ babies from their cribs and draw bulls-eyes on their dimpled bellies with Magic Marker before returning them unharmed. We laugh over blood orange mimosas. We go on Sunday drives in our gold hearse. We hold hands around the table in the snootiest farm-to-table restaurant in town while other patrons glare at us. We hum spells until their wine glasses shatter. We leave a $666 tip for the waitress as an apology. We trip over to the nearest dive bar with sticky floors. We win every game of pool and darts. We leave men floating helplessly in the air if they try to cop a feel. We return to the backyard and chant, as t-bone steaks and marinated tofu sizzle on the grill. We hope the neighbours are watching.

Anna Cabe
Coven

A witch

The Witch who might draw skulls and bones in the dust, then sneeze it away…

…so she could feel their souls disinhibit, reinhabit their tremulous nostrils. Each soul, a vast warm fingerprint , felt different, she could roil it in her hand like clay; smelled different, Will could hear her snuffing his life away; tasted different, she savoured them with her raw-gummed mouth, her puff-adder tongue; sounded different, she stuffed their souls in one ear, tissued them out the other!

Ray Bradbury
Something Wicked This Way Comes

magic in the air

May 26, 2018

Just feel the magic in the air and the power in the breeze, feel the energy of the plants, the bushes and the trees, let yourself be surrounded by nature at its best, calm yourself, focus and let magic do the rest.

Sally Walker
The Village Witch Blog

the illusionist Loran at the Festival de magie de Québec

Magic calls for real suspension of disbelief, except when you do mentalism, which is what I’ve done the last few years more than other things. That you can do with women, too, because you get them to believe you are reading their minds and all that. It’s straight charlatanism, you know. Precognition and all that sort of stuff: they’ll believe anything if you give them a spiel about that. But magic to me is a very special kind of thing. It’s just what Robert Houdin, who was the greatest magician of all time, defined a magician as being: ‘A great actor playing the part of a magician.’ I don’t recognise magic as a style that can be applied to the theatre or movies. Maybe it’s true of my work, but I don’t see it. To me, magic begins and ends with the figure of the magician who asks the audience, for a moment, to believe that the lady is floating in the air. In other words, be eight years old for a minute. And that has no connection with movies or the theatre, I think.

Orson Welles
Interview with Peter Bogdanovich for This Is Orson Welles

Witch

April 15, 2018

To burn the witch is to admit the magic…

no definite talent

April 10, 2018

Went back to night school there about a year ago and took some art courses, commercial and otherwise but then too, they moved too slow for me and wanted too much obeisance. I have no definite talent or trade, and how I stay alive is largely a matter of magic.

Charles Bukowski
On Writing

a crow

Crows and ravens are the creatures of the otherworld, and are portents of omens, magic, witchcraft, death, regeneration, and prophecy. In truth, anything black was considered a creature of the devil. Black dogs, for example: the howling of a dog was the announcement of death, and dogs have had a long, deep association with death and the otherworld. Even as recently as 1922 in Somerset, the black cat was considered to be a creature of the devil, but to own one was regarded as having a lucky talisman – showing the duality of the folklore. Black horses can symbolize death, as do black birds of most types, such as magpies. A pair of crows was called a “corbie (Scottish) coupling,” from the Latin word for crow (Corvus). The powerful omen of the crow has marked inaugurations; one cawing on the roof of a church in St. Andrews, Scotland, during the 16th century inauguration of Patrick Adamson as archbishop was said to have been saying “Corrupt! Corrupt!”. The crow is still linked to agriculture, as we have scarecrows, and the folk art of the crow always with the harvest; even in modern France there is an agricultural festival dedicated to this bird. Anyone who has lived with crows knows them as more than mere birds; some call them “feathered humans” because of their ability to speak and bond with humans.

Annie Forsyth
Ravens and Crows
The Beltane Papers winter 2009/2010