to seduce men

October 13, 2017

In childhood a female must be subject to her father, in youth to her husband, and when her lord is dead, to her sons; a woman must never be independent … It is the nature of women to seduce men in this world, for that reason the wise never remain unguarded in the company of females … Women, shudra (the lowest of four castes), dog and crow embody untruth, sin and darkness.

Vatsyayana
Kama Sutra

reveal and conceal

October 1, 2017

vulv

Painting vulvae, focusing on details of women’s bodies, even the parts that are ‘supposed’ to be hidden, does sometimes feel like a small act of resistance ― a way of saying that women don’t need to hide, that we deserve a place, not just in the art world, but in every sector.

It’s part of this strange dichotomy that culture has created for women: reveal and conceal. On one hand, we’re always supposed to reveal enough of ourselves to be sexually attractive, but simultaneously we’re expected to conceal our bodies, our opinions, and, ultimately, I believe, our power.

Jacqueline Secor
Huffington Post 21 February 2017

a threatening warning

September 4, 2017

The woman who eschews femininity, who is content with her natural shape and size and smell, who is impatient with the lengthy rituals of femininity, is condemned by both sexes. To women, she is an uncomfortable reminder of the extent to which they have abandoned themselves to the demands of men. To men, she is a threatening warning that their domination is not total and that women still have the power to regain themselves.

Anne Summers
Damned Whores and God’s Police

Upside down, inside out

June 10, 2017

9th June

I love her grinding against me. I love her doing that until she moans in my mouth.

I’m a creature of many addictions: women, words, whiskey…and chocolate! Chocolate brings out the primordial in me: it’s like original sin, or the sudden shock of first sexual contact; it’s a secret, eternal flame in my head, flooding my body with endorphins! And God, I always need it – not in the way you need something in order to survive, but in a way that makes life worthwhile. It is so real, so raw – like a teenage hard-on! Eating chocolate you feel yourself inside out, and you realise ‘there are no walls here anymore!’

On the other hand it’s a bit of a bugger if it melts in your hand –

And whiskey…well…it allows you to see through the flaws in your own ego. It deadens and distorts. Mists your window on the world – so that your vanity, your fears and desires become totally out of proportion to any other observable reality – which is not necessarily a good thing! However, it does also help you forget that you’ve eaten all that lovely chocolate, and there is no more!

And women – even at their worse, they are feckin’ incredible! They have always been the sunshine in my life…And, at times, the darkness, too!

So, what of words? Words have always been my life, for as long as I can remember. But not through choice, of course. Who would voluntarily chose words as their life?

Words dominate because of something darker , deeper inside of me. My demons, perhaps? Who can say – ?

I’ve been trying to think of a more realistic ending to fairy tales. Instead of ‘And they lived happily ever after’, go for ‘And she never saw him again, ever…’

Amongst some races the constrictor vaginæ muscles are abnormally developed. In Abyssinia, for instance, a woman can so exert them as to cause pain to a man, and, when sitting upon his thighs, she can induce the orgasm without moving any other part of her person. Such an artist is called by the Arabs, “Kabbazah,” literally meaning “a holder,” and it is not surprising that the slave dealers pay large sums for her. All women have more or less the power, but they wholly neglect it; indeed, there are many races in Europe which have never even heard of it. To these the words of wisdom spoken by Kalyana Malla, the poet, should be peculiarly acceptable.

Sir Richard F Buton (translation)
Footnote from The Anaga Ranga

bleeding-hand

A woman must continually watch herself. She is almost continually accompanied by her own image of herself. Whilst she is walking across a room or whilst she is weeping at the death of her father, she can scarcely avoid envisaging herself walking or weeping. From earliest childhood she has been taught and persuaded to survey herself continually. And so she comes to consider the surveyor and the surveyed within her as the two constituent yet always distinct elements of her identity as a woman. She has to survey everything she is and everything she does because how she appears to men, is of crucial importance for what is normally thought of as the success of her life. Her own sense of being in herself is supplanted by a sense of being appreciated as herself by another…One might simplify this by saying: men act and women appear. Men look at women. Women watch themselves being looked at. This determines not only most relations between men and women but also the relation of women to themselves. The surveyor of woman in herself is male: the surveyed female. Thus she turns herself into an object – and most particularly an object of vision: a sight.

John Berger
Ways of Seeing

our most daily movements…

October 6, 2016

eyes

Nature, who has played so many queer tricks upon us, making us so unequally of clay and diamonds, of rainbow and granite, and stuffed them into a case, often of the most incongruous, for the poet has a butcher’s face and the butcher a poet’s; nature, who delights in muddle and mystery, so that even now (the first of November, 1927) we know not why we go upstairs, or why we come down again, our most daily movements are like the passage of a ship on an unknown sea, and the sailors at the mast-head ask, pointing their glasses to the horizon: Is there land or is there none? to which, if we are prophets, we make answer “Yes”; if we are truthful we say “No”; nature, who has so much to answer for besides the perhaps unwieldy length of this sentence, has further complicated her task and added to our confusion by providing not only a perfect ragbag of odds and ends within us — a piece of a policeman’s trousers lying cheek by jowl with Queen Alexandra’s wedding veil — but has contrived that the whole assortment shall be lightly stitched together by a single thread. Memory is the seamstress, and a capricious one at that. Memory runs her needle in and out, up and down, hither and thither. We know not what comes next, or what follows after. Thus, the most ordinary movement in the world, such as sitting down at a table and pulling the inkstand towards one, may agitate a thousand odd, disconnected fragments, now bright, now dim, hanging and bobbing and dipping and flaunting, like the underlinen of a family of fourteen on a line in a gale of wind. Instead of being a single, downright, bluff piece of work of which no man need feel ashamed, our commonest deeds are set about with a fluttering and flickering of wings, a rising and falling of lights.

Virginia Woolf
Orlando

writing

A man once asked me … how I managed in my books to write such natural conversation between men when they were by themselves. Was I, by any chance, a member of a large, mixed family with a lot of male friends? I replied that, on the contrary, I was an only child and had practically never seen or spoken to any men of my own age till I was about twenty-five. “Well,” said the man, “I shouldn’t have expected a woman (meaning me) to have been able to make it so convincing.” I replied that I had coped with this difficult problem by making my men talk, as far as possible, like ordinary human beings. This aspect of the matter seemed to surprise the other speaker; he said no more, but took it away to chew it over. One of these days it may quite likely occur to him that women, as well as men, when left to themselves, talk very much like human beings also.

Dorothy L. Sayers
Are Women Human? Astute and Witty Essays on the Role of Women in Society

women acquire a poise…

August 24, 2016

Trabajo en proceso - Marcelo Marchese

At the age of eleven or thereabouts women acquire a poise and an ability to handle difficult situations which a man, if he is lucky, manages to achieve somewhere in the later seventies.

P.G. Wodehouse
Uneasy Money